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5 article(s) found.
Cheng-hao Pao, Associate Professor, Department of Global Politics and Economics, Tamkang University.
Party Image and Indigenous Voting Choice: A Case Study of the 2016 Presidential Election (in Chinese) Download
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Due to inherent difficulties of minority surveys, our understanding of indigenous election politics largely depends on qualitative studies. However, such studies usually lead to contradictory results because of different cases or interviewees. It is hard to develop a general explanation. This paper, as the very first one to study the relationship between party image and indigenous voting choice by implementing a quantitative method in Taiwan, can improve our understanding of indigenous voting behavior and lay a foundation for future relevant studies. The research results indicate that indigenous voting choice is influenced by party image. Party image affects voting choice significantly. Even under the condition of controlling party identification, the influence of party image on voting choice is still significant. In other words, party image is differs from party identification conceptually but both affect voting choice. This study found that when the direction of party image is the same as party identification, voting choice tends to be consistent with party image and party identification. However, for political neutrals, due to the fact that the DPP's party image is "making progress, changing the status quo, and offering more opportunities to young people," which is more attractive than the KMT's party "conservative" image, they tend to vote DPP.
Chang-chih Lin, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science and Post-doctoral Researcher, Election
Study Center, National Chengchi University.
How Important Is the Identity of the Vice Presidential Candidate for Voters? An Analysis of the 2012 Presidential Election in Taiwan (in Chinese) Download
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This paper focuses on voters' assessment of the role of the vice president and the effect of voter preference for vice presidential candidate (VPC) on voting in the presidential election. Taking the 2012 presidential election in Taiwan as an example, the paper uses individual-level data for analysis. The survey results show differences between voters' assessment of the constitutional role of the vice president and their actual voting behavior. Over 30% of respondents who believe that the vice president plays an important constitutional role do not take into account the VPC when voting in the presidential election. Moreover, voters' assessment of the presidential and vice presidential candidate can be divided into nine categories. The relationship between these categories and voting choice in the election demonstrates the following two hypotheses. First, the presidential candidate (PC) is a more important factor than the VPC in the presidential election, and, second, the VPC still has an effect on voters. The data shows that the effect of the voters' evaluation/preference of VPC on their voting choice is nontrivial and significant. Finally, the binary logit model shows a similar result for influence of the VPC on voting choice and furthermore indicates that the gap between the evaluations to the presidential and vice presidential candidates of the two major parties is a more important factor on voter choice than the specific evaluation toward a single candidate. In the model, the influence of the VPC does not fall away when we take into account the PC and has differential effect on blue-camp and green-camp supporters.
Yi-ching Hsiao, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Administration, Tamkang University.
People's Perception of the Party Lists in Taiwan's 2008 Legislative Election and It's Effect (in Chinese) Download
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The mixed-member majoritarian system was first adopted in the 2008 legislative election in Taiwan. In accordance with this electoral system, each voter has two ballots to cast at the same time. The first ballot is for the candidates in the single member district, and the second is for the party list, which determines the seats each party receives. Theoretically, voters' decision on the second ballot depends not only on his or her party identification but also on the quality of party list. Since the two ballots system was recently adopted in 2008, most people are not familiar with the mixed-member majoritarian system. Therefore, this article attempts to examine the voters' perception of the party list and their preference, and furthermore to assess whether their perception and preference would affect their voting choice on the second ballot. The empirical survey data of TEDS2008L is analyzed in this article to answer these questions. It is found that while most voters can neither recognize the names on the lists of the two major parties nor indicate their preference among the lists. However, voters are significantly more likely to vote for the party list they recognize or prefer. This result indicates that parties should make every endeavor to enhance the quality of the party list in order to receive more votes in this newly adopted electoral system in Taiwan.
Hung-der Fu, Professor, Department of Political Science, Tunghai University
Political Knowledge, Political Evaluation, and Voting Choice: A Study of Legislative Election of 2001 (in Chinese) Download
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That political knowledge may have impacts on political evaluation and political evaluation may affect voting choice have been speculated. Using post-election survey data of the 2001 legislative election, this research intends to explore the explanatory factors that influence political knowledge, to identify the relationship between political knowledge and political evaluation, and to link political evaluation and voting choice. The results show that political knowledge has significant impacts on political evaluation, and political evaluation influences the legislative vote choice. Political evaluation, both the evaluation of economic performance and the evaluation of major parties, influenced by political knowledge independently form socio-demographical factors. After analyzing the full model, we confirmed that political evaluation has impacts on voting choice.
Wen-chun Chen, Graduate Professor and Director, Institute of Political Science, National Sun Yat-sen University.
The Blue and the Green - The Political Ideologies of the Mass Public in the 2000 Taiwan Presidential Election (in Chinese) Download
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In the study of public opinion and mass political attitudes, there are many research subjects which focus on the study of the nature of mass political ideology and the ideological interpretation of voting choice. In this paper, we use the survey data of Taiwan Presidential Election in 2000, to explore the ideological differences between the Blue and the Green. We want to know whether or not the Taiwan's electorate holds political ideologies? Is there a logical coherence or consistency in the mass attitudes toward issues? And, do the electors vote ideologically?

By Left-right self-placement, this study finds that there are 48.37% responses who hold political ideologies and think of political affairs in term of Left-right political spectrum. There are obvious ideological differences between the Blue and the Green. More importantly, voters' political ideologies not only affect their party preference and issue position, but are also a factor in voting decision. Therefore, except for the party voting model, the candidate-oriented voting model, and the issue voting model, we perhaps should pay attention to the ideological voting model, too.