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10 article(s) found.
Shun-chuan Chang, Assistant Professor, Holistic Education Center, Mackay Medical College.
Wen-jong Juang, Professor and Chair, Department of Public Policy and Management, Shin Hsin University(corresponding author).
Transcending Ideological Barriers for Voting? New Applications of Political Territory Analysis in the 2014 Taipei City Mayoral Election (in Chinese) Download
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The 2014 Taipei City mayoral election was overwhelmingly won by a grass-roots candidate, Dr. Wen-je Ko, who has been regarded as "Deep Green" in terms of Taiwan's political spectrum, but promoted the slogan "One City One Family" for new white power in this campaign. The rooted voting behaviors described by traditional political territories in Taipei City were supposed to be on the verge of imminent collapse, and whether the signal of transcending ideological barriers for voting in this case was grounded in reality or myth, is still worth exploring. This study conducted several tests for trend analyses used in nonparametric statistics and interpreted new applications based on political territory in this mayoral election. Furthermore, this study has three primary innovative perspectives. First, based on the voting database from the Central Election Commission for election studies, this study can explain how to utilize the basic unit of household address, such as Li, for building political territories, and our models presented the grouping political spectrum structures of voting behaviors of voters living in Taipei City by clustering analysis. This study can also develop a more novel approach to the combination of domestic political territory research and trend analyses embedded in nonparametric statistics, such as the Mann-Kendall test, the Theil-Sen's slope estimator, and Pettit test statistics for change-point detection, which are all adapted to analyze the trend characteristics for changing voting behaviors in Taipei City. Finally, based on built political territories, and linked with relevant concepts of political polarization, political party identity, and allocation effects when political parties drum up votes, the research results can determine and gain insight into the transcending of ideological barriers for voting in the 2014 Taipei City mayoral election.
Cody Wai-kwok Yau, Ph. D. Candidate, Institute of Political Science, National Sun Yat-Sen University.
The Meaning of “Taiwanese”: Conceptualizing the Components of Taiwanese National Identity (in English) Download
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One of the problems with empirical studies of Taiwanese/Chinese identity in Taiwan is the use of over-simplified measurements based on responses to a question involving three choices: is your nationality Taiwanese, Chinese, or both? This study attempts to produce a new model with a more fine-grained conceptualization of national identity in Taiwan. The model is derived from Rawi Abdelal et al.’s idea of social identity, and applies Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) to survey data, to develop a social psychological framework using three independent latent variables: “national norms,”“national closeness,” and “national purposes,” and a single dependent latent variable: “state identity.” The results of this re-analysis show all three of the independent variables have significant positive correlations with the dependent variable “state identity.” Of the independent variables, national norms has the highest total effect.

For respondents self-identifying as Taiwanese (T respondents) and respondents self-identifying as Chinese (C respondents), there were significant differences in two dimensions: national purposes and national norms. The strength of T respondents’ national purposes is higher than C respondents while the strength of C respondents’ national norms is higher than T respondents. In addition, a comparison of total effect value and outer weight found that T respondents and respondents self-identifying as both Taiwanese and Chinese (B respondents) also differed. Both T and B respondents stress on “state-building,” a component of the latent variable national purposes. For the dependent variable state identity, however, B and T respondents differ. T respondents take a pro-Taiwan and anti-unification stance. B respondents, however, take a pro-“Republic of China” and prodemocratic unification stance. Variables such as age, education, and social contacts all have moderating effects for both T and B respondents but not great enough to change the path direction.
Alex C. H. Chang, Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Political Science, Academia Sinica.
Party Identification, Negative Information, and Voting Choices: An Empirical Analysis of Municipal Mayoral Election in 2010 (in Chinese) Download
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In modern electoral campaign, especially that in most single member districts, negative campaigning has become a popular strategy for most candidates. They broadcast negative information about their opponents in order to discourage their supporters and hence garner, if any, electoral advantage and maximize chances of election. Despite its prevalence, scholars still have not achieved an agreement on whether negative campaign is determinant to voting behavior. Especially, while statistics shows that receiving negative information is negatively associated with voting decisions, we found that interviewees generally asserted that the messages did not affect their voting decisions at all. To solve the self-contradictory puzzle, following conventional wisdom, we assert that voters apply party identification as a shortcut to sift political information. Thus, they ignore the negative information about their preferred candidate but reinforce their detestation of the candidates they do not like. We further examine our theory by incorporating the TEDS2010C data with structural equation model. The analytical result supports our hypotheses and shows that voters' party identity and voting decision significantly influence the negative information they received. Nevertheless, the negative information does not have significant influence on voters' voting decisions.
Chiung-chu Lin, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Soochow University.
Change and Continuity: An Analysis of Taiwanese/Chinese Identity and Position on the Cross-Straight Relations (in Chinese) Download
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This paper aims to examine the test-retest reliability of two important political attitudes, i.e. Taiwanese/Chinese identity and issue of Unification/ Independence (UI issue), among the Taiwanese electorate by analyzing the 2004-2008 panel data from the Taiwan Election and Democratization Study. This paper further explores the socio-demographic factors that might affect the consistence of one's Taiwanese/Chinese identity and the position of the issue of Unification/Independence. This paper then examines the relationship between the two political attitudes.The findings suggest that one's Taiwanese/Chinese identity demonstrates higher stability than his/her position on the UI issue. People who identified themselves as Chinese changed to having a ”joint identity”. Those who hold a ”joint identity” have changed to identified themselves as Taiwanese. The factors that affect one's attitude consistency include education, political generation and China experience. Those with less education, the oldest generation and have been to China are more likely to change their attitudes. Moreover, findings from the statistical model show that one's Taiwanese/Chinese identity influences one's position on the UI issue.
Kuang-hui Chen, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, National Chung Cheng University.
A Preliminary Analysis on the Impact of Marriage on Self-Identity (in Chinese) Download
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Given that ethnicity and identity are the principal factors of political cleavage in Taiwan, this article explores the following questions: Whether individuals Taiwanese/Chinese identities are influenced by their spouses' ethnic background? If so, whose identities are more likely to be shaped by the intensive interactions between husbands and wives in a marriage? Answers to these questions are helpful to researchers who are interested in assessing the effect of political socialization experiences during adulthood. This article analyzes pooled survey data from Taiwan's Election and Democratization Study and the main findings are: (1) Ethnic background affects the respondents' self-identities. (2) Respondents tend to marry within their ethnic group. (3) Respondents' self-identities are influenced by their spouses' ethnic background. (4) Although females' self-identities are generally affected by their spouses' ethnicity, the best-educated females' self-identities are less likely to be changed after getting married. (5) The best-educated males' self-identities are more likely to be shifted after getting married than their female counterparts.
Wan-ying Yang, Professor, Department of Political Science, National Chengchi University.
Kuan-chen Lee, Ph.D Candidate, Department of Political Science, National Chengchi University.
Exploring the Influence of Gender Power on National Identity under the Same Roof (1996-2008) (in Chinese) Download
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This study examines how the power relationship within households affects individuals' national identity. Comparing with the past studies which address the collective changes of national identity, this study instead focuses on individual households to explore the malleability of individual national identity changed by marriages. Family power studies have shown that the socioeconomic-resource and gender role differences have great impact upon the power distribution among husbands and wives, this study applies the 1996-2008 cross-sectional data to explore the effect of the gender power within households on individuals' national identity. The results of this investigation show that, individuals' national identity is affected by their spouses' ethnic groupings, and women are more likely than men to be affected by their spouses'. The models show that, on the male part, their identity on Taiwanese/Chinese and pro-independence/unification are significantly affected by their own ethnic backgrounds, party identification, and the year of investigation, these factors also affect women's national identities. However, in contrast to men, women's identity on Taiwanese/ Chinese and pro-independence/unification are greatly affected by their spouses' ethnicities. In terms of the Taiwanese/Chinese identity, women are directly affected by their husbands' ethnicities, regardless of their differences in socio-economic status or political engagements. Relatively, in terms of the pro-independence/unification identity, women are indirectly affected by their husbands' ethnic backgrounds caused by the educational gap. As the wives' education level gets lower, their pro-independence/unification stance is more likely to be affected by their husbands' ethnicities. In short, the gender asymmetries of which wives' identity affected by their husbands' ethnicities are not fixed, rather they are distributed differently across households and varied by identity dimensions.
Lu-huei Chen, Research Fellow, Election Study Center, National Chengchi University.
Shu Keng, Associate Professor, Graduate Institute of East Asian Studies, National Chengchi University.
T. Y. Wang, Professor, Department of Politics & Government, Illinois State University.
Taiwan's 2008 Presidential Election and Its Implications on Cross-Strait Relations: The Effects of Taiwanese Identity, Trade Interests and Military Threats (in Chinese) Download
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Based on the analysis of survey data collected on the eve of Taiwan's 2008 presidential election, our study seeks to clarify the effects of the following factors on the island citizens' voting behavior: (1)Taiwanese identity, (2)expected benefits from cross-Strait economic exchanges, and (3)the perceived likelihood of China's use of military force. The findings show that, in addition to party identification, both Taiwanese identity and expected economic benefits have important effects on the islanders' vote choices. Unexpectedly, China's military threats played an insignificant role in voters' decisions. Because Taiwanese identity and expected economic benefits are at the center of the political discourse on cross-Strait relations, future interactions between Taiwan and China will continue to play a significant role in the island's politics.
Su-feng Cheng, Associate Research Fellow, Election Study Center, National Chengchi University.
Ethnicity, Identity, and Vote Choice in Taiwan (in Chinese) Download
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Ethnic and identity problems are important issues in modern Taiwanese politics. This paper examines Taiwanese identity from the aspect of ethnic and identity theory. The author develops a ”Taiwanese consciousness” index to explore the effect of identity in the past four presidential elections. The results show that Taiwanese consciousness has increased year by year, with more than half (54.7%) of Taiwan voters now classified into the high level of Taiwanese consciousness. The data also show that people with different degrees of Taiwanese consciousness vote differently and are increasingly polarized around identity. People with high-level Taiwanese consciousness tend to vote for pan-green candidates, while people with lowlevel Taiwanese consciousness tend to vote for pan-blue candidates. The data also indicate that the support bases of different parties are quite different. Votes for pan-green candidates mostly come from people with high-level Taiwanese consciousness, and this fraction has steadily increased; at the same time, support for pan-blue candidates has fallen significantly among this group. The analysis shows that partisan identification performs better than the ”Taiwanese consciousness” index at predicting vote choice, but the ”Taiwanese consciousness” index still has additional explanatory power. This paper also finds that the effect of ”sengi” (voters' provincial background) is not significant in the four presidential elections after controlling for other variables. This result suggests that the identity issue in Taiwan is now more an expression of ideological differences than ethnic ones.
Who Vote Lee Teng-hui in Presidential Election? (in Chinese)
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This paper wants to know who is Lee’s votary and examines the importance of candidate image, party identity, candidate’s ability in the presidential election of 1996.The result indicated that Lee’s main votaries are older, low school record and live in rural. Furthermore, candidate image turned out to be the most important factor in determining vote-choice. Party identity and candidate’s ability ranked the next. In the Logit Model, Category of candidate images inclined to Lee Teng-hui and candidate images inclined to Lin Yang-kang had the most prominent contribution. Category of party identity trend to KMT and party identity trend to NP ranked the next. The result accord with social fact that voters of NP have strong anti-Lee complex, otherwise some DPP’s followers have Lee Teng-hui complex. 
Independence v.s. Reunification Issue and Voting Behavior in Taiwan: An Analysis of Gubernatorial and Mayoral Elections in 1994 (in Chinese)
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Taiwan’s democratization has directly challenged the KMT’s authoritarian political regime and induced polarized national indentity confrontation. This phenomena has become a major force in party politics in Taiwan. This paper has adopted the suvery datd as a result of a special research project commissioned by National Science Commission in 1994 to be reference of analysis. It is carried out on the basis of independence v.s. unification attitude of the constituency, comparing several recent suvery data distribution on the independence v.s. unification issue, and analyzing social basis of independence v.s. unification attitude, eithnic identuty, suport for political party, political trust, orientation of democratic values, and participation in election etc. as well as the relations between these variables and independence v.s. unification attitude, so as to ascertain whether independence v.s. unification issue being the key variable in the process of Taiwan’s political democratization.