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5 article(s) found.
Chung-Ii Wu, Professor, Department of Political Science, National Chung-Cheng University.
Shih-hung Lee, Ph D. Student, Department of Political Science, National Chung-Cheng University.
Political Empowerment, Ethnic Groups, and Political Participation: Political Trust and Voting Participation of the Hakkas in the 2001 County Magistrate/City Mayoral Elections in Taiwan (in Chinese) Download
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This study examines the theoretical linkages of political participation of (ethnic/racial) minority groups. Instead of the perspectives of ”socioeconomic model” and ”psychological factor” developed in preceding literature, this research employs ”empowerment theory” of minority politics to account for the levels of political trust and voting participation of the Hakkas in the 2001 county magistrate/city mayoral elections in Taiwan. Using the 2001 Taiwan's Election and Democratization Study (TEDS 2001) survey data, we examine whether the Hakkas in high-empowerment areas-as indicated by control of the local executive-are more active than the Hakkas living in low-empowerment areas. The methodology adopted in this study involves cross-tabulation analyses, ordered logit model, and logit model respectively. As the data show, the contextual effects of ”political empowerment” emerge as a statistically significant influence on improving the level of political participation of the minority group. As hypothesized, the results indicate that the Hakkas in high-empowerment areas tend to hold higher levels of political trust and voting participation, and vice versa. In the conclusion, we summarize the major findings and propose some research suggestions for further investigations.
Lu-huei Chen, Assistant Research Fellow, Election Study Center, National Chengchi University, Taiwan.
Su-feng Cheng, Assistant Research Fellow, Election Study Center, National Chengchi University, Taiwan.
The Study of Correlations among Interview Language Usage and Political Attitudes in Taiwan (in Chinese) Download
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In this paper, we examine how different dialects used in survey research, and present how language usage might be correlated with people’s national identity and Taiwan independence preference. It was shown that people’s national identity was correlated with language used in face-to-face interviews. People speaking Taiwanese dialect were more likely to identify themselves as Taiwanese, and people speaking Mandarin were more likely to identify themselves as Chinese. It indicated that language used by people’s daily life conversation might be a cue for their national identity. Therefore, national identity is more likely to connect with cultural dimension. However, in surveys, there was no connection between language usage and people’s preference on Taiwan independence issue.

From our findings, comparing with people’s “Taiwanese/Chinese” identity, people’s preference toward unification with mainland China or Taiwan independence is more likely to be a rational choice between two alternatives. For students of survey research and political identities research in Taiwan, our research findings are very constructive.
Emile C. J. Sheng, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Soochow University, Taipei, Taiwan.
A Study of Taiwanese Democratic Value and Political Trust - A Comparison before and after the Alternation of Power (in Chinese) Download
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The democratic value of the people has key influence on the quality of democracy in a country, the level of political trust of the people also influences the legitimacy of the regime. This article focuses on the democratic value and political trust of Taiwanese people, placing emphasis on the changing pattern before and after the alternation of power. We first look at the attitude changes in these issues over time, then examine the factors influencing the attitude changes before and after the alternation of power. We found there is still room for improvements on these political attitudes. Taiwanese people's democratic values ranking from high to low by order are principles of equality, political participation, freedom, check and balance, and diversity. After the alternation of power, eight out of ten principles showed a tendency of deterioration. On political trust, people's trust level from high to low by order are 'consider people's welfare, 'trust toward leaders,' 'ablitity on planning,' 'making the right decision,' 'wasting tax money,' 'integrity of politicians.' After the alternation of power, there are increased trust on the policy making dimension, but decreased trust on both credibility and integrity dimensions. On factors influencing these attitudes changes, ethnic background played only limited role but partisanship has a rather large influence, especially on the political trust level. Finally, we discuss the problem of validity of these questionnaires.
Lu-huei Chen, Assistant Research Fellow, Election Study Center, National Chengchi Uni­versity, Taiwan.
Political Trust and Voting Behavior in Taiwan (in Chinese) Download
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In this paper, we employ longitudinal data to explore the change and continuity of political trust among the electorate in Taiwan. After the 2000 presidential election, whether the distribution of political trust will follow the rotation of ruling power is our research interest. We also would like to explore which factors affect people's political trust, and how political trust might affect people's voting behavior. By employing 1992, 1995, 1998, and 2001 face-to face interviews after legislative elections, we are able to explore the change and continuity of people's political trust in Taiwan.

From our findings, we showed that the distribution of people's political trust declined during 1992 and 1998. However, as the 2001 survey data showed, people's political trust rebounded after the 2000 presidential election. Among factors affected people's political trust, people's partisan preference toward the KMT, voters among the first generation, people with elementary school education were more likely to have higher level of political trust between 1992 and 1998. However, people with the DPP or the NP partisan preference were more likely to have lower level of political trust. After the 2000 presidential election, people with the DPP partisan preference changed their level of political trust, and became more likely to trust the ruling authorities. We also demonstrated that people with higher level of political trust were more likely to support the ruling party in the legislative elections.
Chung-Li Wu, Assistant Professor of Political Science, National Chung Cheng University.
Ching-Ping Tang, Assistant Professor of Political Science, National Chung Cheng University.
Chi Huang, Professor of Political Science, National Chung Cheng University.
A Pilot Study on Measuring the Sense of Political Efficacy in Taiwan (in Chinese) Download
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The concept of political efficacy has played significant roles in various theories of political attitude and behavior. This paper first briefly reviews its historical development and then concentrates on its operationalization and measurement in survey questionnaires. Recognizing the importance of standardization, we faithfully translate into Chinese the three questions initially composed by the National Election Studies (NES). These translated questions are then applied to a telephone interview in Chia-Yi, Taiwan, conducted in early December of 1998. Our analysis indicates that these three Chinese-version items also reveal internal as well as external dimensions of political efficacy, a finding that coincides well with the existing literature. We therefore conclude that the three standardized questions may be applied in surveys of wider context. Undoubtedly, there are still certain linguistic ambiguities in question-wording translation. We suggest some possible solutions in future studies.